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How To Accessorize With Scarves





Scarves make great accessories. They can be worn as headwraps, shawls, beach cover-ups, or for a little extra warmth on a chilly day.

A scarf can provide great cover for a low-cut top or dress. You know when you really love the top, but you're just a tad uncomfortable having a little cleavage showing at the office, church or dinner party.



I have worn a vibrant scarf to add a pop of color to a really conservative business suit. I remember when scarves were my signature accessory. So much so, that my co-workers would wait to see what kind of scarf I would be wearing on any given day. 

Here's a video of my take on styling a scarf:



There were times that I would stop at a street vendor (in NYC) on my way into the office, just to buy a little scarf to set off my suit or dress. I would wear it tied loosely at my left or right shoulder. 


Sometimes I would fold the scarf into a triangle, drape it over my chest and tie it behind my neck. I also used to wear my scarf rolled up around my neck, and tucked inside my collar or neckline. This look worked well when I didn't want the scarf to be the focal point of my outfit. 

People at work used to comment that I had so many clothes. Little did they know that it wasn't that I had a lot of clothes, I just used accessories like scarves, brooches and pearls to change the look of my outfits.

I strongly believe that a pretty scarf can change the look of any outfit. It's so versatile!

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